Review: THAT SILENT NIGHT: A Lady Emily Christmas Story (Lady Emily #10.5)

Hello, hello!

I am back, after another accidental hiatus. Things have been crazy, what with everything going on in the world. I spent the last half of March in Maryland before returning to Rhode Island, where I had to quarantine for two weeks. From there on out, I’ve just been trying to get by. I’m a person who thrives on schedules and routines, and all of my previous routines have been blown to bits, so it’s been a rough two months.

But, nevertheless, I am back and I have a lot of reviews to catch up on! On top of finishing my Lady Emily reviews (whoops) I’ve been doing quite a bit of reading and I have Thoughts to share.

Before I go on, though, let me use my small platform to reiterate a few things:

Stay home unless you absolutely have to leave. Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Stay 6ft apart in public. Stop going to beaches/parks/protests, stop demanding places reopen so you can get your hair cut, just… Stop.

I have a compromised immune system and am at-risk. I have to go back to work this week while customers can come shop, and I am terrified. So please, stay home and stay distant as long as you possibly can. I, and everyone at-risk like me, thank you!


Now, onto our regularly scheduled programming. As always, here’s a quick spoiler alert!

May is a great time to review another Christmas story, right? Today I’m reviewing Tasha Alexander’s THAT SILENT NIGHT, Lady Emily #10.5! I read this story in one day (January 22-23) and gave it a solid 5-stars.

This story takes place during the holiday season following the events of THE ADVENTURESS, which saw our poor Jeremy betrayed by the only woman (besides Emily, of course) he’s ever loved. Jeremy will heal, though we know he’ll play it up for sympathy because that’s just who Jeremy is (and we love him for it).

Lady Emily Hargreaves and her dashing husband, Colin, have returned to London alone, without their three boys, to get some Christmas shopping done. Their quiet solitude is quickly interrupted, though, when Emily sees the apparition of a woman standing outside of her home in the snow. Convinced she’s seen someone in distress, she rushes to help, but when she arrives at the spot across the road where the woman once stood, she’s gone. There are no footprints in the snow, and Emily is convinced she has seen a ghost. The apparition appears several more times, haunting Emily—and, as it turns out, her neighbor’s wife.

Most of England’s elite have retreated to the countryside for the winter, except for the Hargreaves’ new neighbor and his new wife, Penelope. When Emily meets them, she is jarred by how much Penelope resembles the apparition that’s been wailing outside of her window. Always one to meddle—though she always comes from a good place—Emily is concerned Penelope is suffering from hysteria. After learning that she has not been going outside at night, Emily finds out that Penelope sees the same woman at night—and is convinced it is the ghost of her sister, who she was separated from at a young age. Penelope was sent to live with an aunt after her mother’s death, while her sister was sent to an orphanage where, Penelope believed, her sister had perished.

Emily and Colin don’t believe in ghosts, though, and the couple are determined to crack this case.

The end of this story was adorably wholesome and satisfying. I think this was one of my favorite Lady Emily novellas, due in large part to the mixture of mystery and ghost story here. These Christmas stories are so wholesome, though. I definitely recommend this novella to any fans of the Lady Emily series, but you’ve got to read them in order the first time around to get the full effect!

As with all of the Christmas novellas, I will definitely be revisiting this story in December!

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